Triggers

Professionals can experience several triggers that can make them uncertain during their process.

Here you find six triggers that are revealed by our research.

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Self-disclosure

During your process you make choices, you doubt, you get insights, you experience learning moments. By self-disclosure you show this to others. For example in a conversation, by a certain expression, image or product. Because you reveal something this personal, you can feel uncertain.

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Judgment

Feedback, an opinion, appreciation or an assessment can also make you uncertain. These are expressed by others. For example, by a colleague, supervisor, teacher or fellow student. You may experience this as a judgment of you and your self-disclosure. But you also judge yourself: your commitment, quality or achieved result. In addition to uncertainty, judgement can also evoke certainty. A compliment, can be a very positive ‘judgement’.

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Risk

In order to make progress, you must be willing to take some risk. Risk of judgment by others, for example about your self-disclosure. But also investment risk: does the time and energy you invest deliver the desired result? All this can create uncertainty.

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Freedom

Each process offers a some freedom, such as freedom of choice or freedom to take initiative. If you prefer to be independent, a lot of freedom is beneficial for you. But if you have a greater need for structure and frameworks, it is not. So too much and too little freedom can evoke uncertainty and certainty.

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Ability

You may feel more or less capable of performing a task. That feeling can vary at different times, but it can leave you feeling uncertain. Whether you feel competent is also related to past and recent experiences, your self-image, and can be influenced by the reaction of others.

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Other

‘Others’ play an important role in uncertainty. Others can provide support, empowerment, judgment, expectations, feedback or confirmation. This can make you uncertain or certain. Others can vary much: a colleague, manager, fellow student, teacher, friend, companion, parents or any other important person.

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